Rad Tech CE, ASRT, ARRT® CE, Category A Credits | Radiology Continuing Education

Approvals/Requirements Satisfied by eRADIMAGING Courses

  • ASRT approval for ARRT Category A credit
  • All Courses eligible of international radiographers' CPD requirements
  • ASRT and MDCB are approved continuing education providers of ARRT and all courses are accepted by ARRT
  • California CE requirements met for all radiography courses
  • NMTCB accepted (All Courses)
  • All Courses available for RRAs
  • ARMRIT accepted (All MRI Courses)
  • MDCB approval by the Medical Dosimetrist Certification (Selected Courses)
  • Florida approval for all courses 1 credit or more
  • ARDMS accepted (All Courses)
  • CAMRT and Sonography Canada recognize the ASRT approval (All Courses)
  • Approval: This course is approved by ASRT - an approved continuing education provider of ARRT.
  • Release Date: 11/14/2008
  • Expiration Date: 11/30/2012
  • Credit Hours: 1 Credit
  • Course Description and objectives:

    Course Description

    The medical imaging field has been considerably impacted in recent years by the emergence of digital imaging modalities, including computed radiography (CR) and digital radiography (DR), also known as direct digital radiography. Digital systems often allow for a streamlining of workflow and greater flexibility in staffing options, which may help offset the substantial costs associated with acquiring digital equipment. When comparing CR and DR, each type of system offers relative advantages, but DR may represent a better option for some facilities with a larger patient load due to the greater ease of use and elimination of cassette handling with DR. When considering a switch to CR or DR, facilities should anticipate the need for extensive staff training because medical imaging professionals require specialized knowledge in these systems to make the regular adjustments to image acquisition and processing that limit radiation dose while preserving image quality. This review addresses important similarities and differences between CR and DR technologies and explains technical practices that can help maximize the safety and diagnostic strength of these modalities.

    Learning Objectives

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to:

    • Explain the possible advantages and disadvantages of computed radiography (CR) versus direct digital radiography (DR) in terms of workflow and costs.
    • Describe the basic operation of CR and DR systems.
    • Assess the factors that play a role in the overall costs of operating in a digital environment.
    • Discuss the relative challenges in limiting radiation exposure in CR and DR.
    • Identify factors that affect image quality with digital imaging modalities.
    • Cite possible diagnostic limitations to digital radiography in specific clinical applications.

  • CE Information:

    In order to receive CE credit, you must first complete the activity content. When completed, go to the "CE Test" link to access the post-test.

    Submit the completed answers to determine if you have passed the post-test assessment. You must obtain a score of 75% to receive the CE credit. You will have no more than 3 attempts to successfully complete the post-test.

    Participants successfully completing the activity content and passing the post-test will receive 1.0 ARRT Category A credits.

    Approved by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists for ARRT Category A credit.

    This activity may be available in multiple formats or from different sponsors. ARRT does not allow CE activities such as Internet courses, home study programs, or directed readings to be repeated for CE credit in the same or any subsequent biennium.


Computed Radiography and Digital Radiography: A Comparison of Technology, Functionality, Patient Dose, and Image Quality

Tracy Herrmann, MEd, RT(R)

   *Professor, Allied Health University of Cincinnati, Raymond Walters College, Blue Ash, Ohio.
   Address correspondence to: Tracy Herrmann, MEd, RT(R), Professor, Allied Health University of Cincinnati, Raymond Walters College, 9555 Plainfield Road, Blue Ash, OH 45236. E-mail: tracy.hermann@uc.edu.

Disclosure: Ms Herrmann reports having no significant financial or advisory relationships with corporate organizations related to this activity.

ABSTRACT

The medical imaging field has been considerably impacted in recent years by the emergence of digital imaging modalities, including computed radiography (CR) and digital radiography (DR), also known as direct digital radiography. Digital systems often allow for a streamlining of workflow and greater flexibility in staffing options, which may help offset the substantial costs associated with acquiring digital equipment. When comparing CR and DR, each type of system offers relative advantages, but DR may represent a better option for some facilities with a larger patient load due to the greater ease of use and elimination of cassette handling with DR. When considering a switch to CR or DR, facilities should anticipate the need for extensive staff training because medical imaging professionals require specialized knowledge in these systems to make the regular adjustments to image acquisition and processing that limit radiation dose while preserving image quality. This review addresses important similarities and differences between CR and DR technologies and explains technical practices that can help maximize the safety and diagnostic strength of these modalities.

View the full content

Sample eRADIMAGING Course *

* This sample course is for reference purposes only. It is not currently available for earning CE credits. To earn ARRT CE credits please subscribe to eRADIMAGING where you will see a complete listing of all active and eligible CE courses.

Become a member

Satisfy your CE requirements today!

Join now

We offer special group rates, call or email.

908-253-9001

webmaster@eradimaging.com

Newsletter

Enter your email address to receive our new course alerts.