Rad Tech CE, ASRT, ARRT® CE, Category A Credits | Radiology Continuing Education

Approvals/Requirements Satisfied by eRADIMAGING Courses

  • ASRT approval for ARRT Category A credit
  • All Courses eligible of international radiographers' CPD requirements
  • ASRT and MDCB are approved continuing education providers of ARRT and all courses are accepted by ARRT
  • California CE requirements met for all radiography courses
  • NMTCB accepted (All Courses)
  • All Courses available for RRAs
  • ARMRIT accepted (All MRI Courses)
  • MDCB approval by the Medical Dosimetrist Certification (Selected Courses)
  • Florida approval for all courses 1 credit or more
  • ARDMS accepted (All Courses)
  • CAMRT and Sonography Canada recognize the ASRT approval (All Courses)
  • Approval: This course is approved by ASRT - an approved continuing education provider of ARRT.
  • Release Date: 6/11/2019
  • Expiration Date: 6/30/2022
  • Credit Hours: 1.25 Credits
  • Course Description and objectives:

    Course Description
    Aside from skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women. It is the second leading cause of cancer death and only lung cancer kills more women each year. Improvements in imaging and new treatment options have improved morbidity and mortality in patients with breast cancer. The average 10-year survival rate is now 83%. If the cancer is located only in the patient's breast, the 5-year survival rate is 99%; however, if the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, the 5-year survival drops to 83%. Early detection is the key to increased survival. Screening mammography, first with film followed by digital imaging, has been the gold standard for breast cancer detection. However, the overall sensitivity is limited by the presence of dense fibroglandular breast tissue, which can obscure an underlying cancer; specificity is also limited as overlapping fibroglandular breast tissue can mimic the appearance of breast cancer. Approved in 2011, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can address some of the limitations encountered with standard mammographic views. DBT allows for the creation of thin-section reconstructed images that may decrease the lesion-masking effect of overlapping normal tissue and also decrease the rate of recall for benign findings. However, interpretation time and radiation dose are increased. Since the introduction of DBT to the clinical landscape in 2011, many facilities have adopted this technology for both screening and diagnosis. This article will discuss the current state DBT for screening women with suspected breast cancer.

    Learning Objectives:
    After reading this article, the participant should be able to:

    • DESCRIBE current breast cancer statistics and breast cancer screening recommendations.
    • EXPLAIN the clinical advantages and potential limitations of DBT.
    • DISCUSS the benefits of synthesized digital mammography.

    Categories: Mammography, Digital Mammography

  • CE Information:

    In order to receive CE credit, you must first complete the activity content. When completed, go to the "Take CE Test!" link to access the post-test.

    Submit the completed answers to determine if you have passed the post-test assessment. You must answer 8 out of 10 questions correctly to receive the CE credit. You will have no more than 3 attempts to successfully complete the post-test.

    Participants successfully completing the activity content and passing the post-test will receive 1.25 ARRT Category A credits.

    Approved by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists for ARRT Category A credit.

    Approved by the state of Florida for ARRT Category A credit.

    Texas direct credit.

    This activity may be available in multiple formats or from different sponsors. ARRT does not allow CE activities such as Internet courses, home study programs, or directed readings to be repeated for CE credit in the same biennium.


Three-Dimensional Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: An Update

Linda Giering, PhD

ABSTRACT

Aside from skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women. It is the second leading cause of cancer death and only lung cancer kills more women each year. Improvements in imaging and new treatment options have improved morbidity and mortality in patients with breast cancer. The average 10-year survival rate is now 83%. If the cancer is located only in the patient’s breast, the 5-year survival rate is 99%; however, if the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, the 5-year survival drops to 83%. Early detection is the key to increased survival. Screening mammography, first with film followed by digital imaging, has been the gold standard for breast cancer detection. However, the overall sensitivity is limited by the presence of dense fibroglandular breast tissue, which can obscure an underlying cancer; specificity is also limited as overlapping fibroglandular breast tissue can mimic the appearance of breast cancer. Approved in 2011, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) can address some of the limitations encountered with standard mammographic views. DBT allows for the creation of thin-section reconstructed images that may decrease the lesion-masking effect of overlapping normal tissue and also decrease the rate of recall for benign findings. However, interpretation time and radiation dose are increased. Since the introduction of DBT to the clinical landscape in 2011, many facilities have adopted this technology for both screening and diagnosis. This article will discuss the current state DBT for screening women with suspected breast cancer.

View the full content

Sample eRADIMAGING Course *

* This sample course is for reference purposes only. It is not currently available for earning CE credits. To earn ARRT CE credits please subscribe to eRADIMAGING where you will see a complete listing of all active and eligible CE courses.

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