Rad Tech CE, ASRT, ARRT® CE, Category A Credits | Radiology Continuing Education

Approvals/Requirements Satisfied by eRADIMAGING Courses

  • ASRT approval for ARRT Category A credit
  • All Courses eligible of international radiographers' CPD requirements
  • ASRT and MDCB are approved continuing education providers of ARRT and all courses are accepted by ARRT
  • California CE requirements met for all radiography courses
  • NMTCB accepted (All Courses)
  • All Courses available for RRAs
  • ARMRIT accepted (All MRI Courses)
  • MDCB approval by the Medical Dosimetrist Certification (Selected Courses)
  • Florida approval for all courses 1 credit or more
  • ARDMS accepted (All Courses)
  • CAMRT and Sonography Canada recognize the ASRT approval (All Courses)
  • Approval: This course is approved by ASRT - an approved continuing education provider of ARRT.
  • Release Date: 11/5/2019
  • Expiration Date: 12/1/2022
  • Credit Hours: 1 Credit
  • Course Description and objectives:

    Course Description
    Chronic liver disease has many causes, but all are associated with inflammation, which can lead to fibrosis—the accumulation of proteins that form scar tissue. As the scar tissue replaces normal tissue, the liver becomes stiff. Eventually, fibrosis can lead to cirrhosis and, ultimately, liver failure. Liver biopsy has traditionally been used to assess fibrosis, but it is invasive and can cause complications. Elastography refers to a group of methods that use imaging technologies (ultrasound or magnetic resonance) to estimate the stiffness of the liver and therefore the amount of fibrosis present. In each method, a transducer is used to generate shear waves within the liver, and the speed of the waves is measured. The stiffer the tissue, the faster the waves travel, so the speed can be used as, or converted into, a liver stiffness measurement. Three ultrasound-based forms of elastography are currently used: transient elastography (TE), point shear wave elastography (pSWE), and 2-dimensional SWE (2D SWE). TE is widely available and does not need to be performed by a radiologist; however, it is not reliable in patients who are obese or have ascites. More expertise is required to perform pSWE and 2D SWE, but obesity and ascites are not limitations. These methods also measure more of the liver, reducing sampling bias. Magnetic resonance elastography is more accurate than ultrasound-based elastography, but it is more expensive and cannot be used in patients with iron overload in the liver. Elastography technology is advancing rapidly, and new methods are likely to emerge.

    Learning Objectives
    After reading this article, the participant should be able to:

    • Describe the causes and mechanisms of liver fibrosis and how elastography estimated fibrosis.
    • Identify the major types of elastography in liver applications and compare and contrast their mechanisms.
    • Describe how each type of liver elastography is performed.
    • Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of each of the major types of elastography.

    Categories: Ultrasound/Sonography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

  • CE Information:

    CE Information
    In order to receive CE credit, you must first complete the activity content. When completed, go to the “Take CE Test!” link to access the post-test.

    Submit the completed answers to determine if you have passed the post-test assessment. You must answer 6 out of 8 questions correctly to receive the CE credit. You will have no more than 3 attempts to successfully complete the post-test.

    Participants successfully completing the activity content and passing the post-test will receive 1.0 ARRT Category A credits or 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.

    Approved by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists for ARRT Category A credit.

    Approved by the state of Florida for ARRT Category A credit.

    Texas direct credit.

    Course is approved for CME credit fulfillment by the ARMRIT.

    This activity may be available in multiple formats or from different sponsors. ARRT does not allow CE activities such as Internet courses, home study programs, or directed readings to be repeated for CE credit in the same biennium.

     


Elastography in Liver Applications

Naomi L. Ruff, PhD, ELS*

*Medical writer, Duluth, Minnesota.

Address correspondence to: Naomi L. Ruff, PhD, ELS, 24 S 59th Ave E, Duluth, MN 55804. Email: naomiruff@ruffdraftwriting.com.

Disclosure Statement: Dr Ruff reports having no financial or advisory relationships with corporate organizations related to this activity.

 

ABSTRACT

Chronic liver disease has many causes, but all are associated with inflammation, which can lead to fibrosis-the accumulation of proteins that form scar tissue. As the scar tissue replaces normal tissue, the liver becomes stiff. Eventually, fibrosis can lead to cirrhosis and, ultimately, liver failure. Liver biopsy has traditionally been used to assess fibrosis, but it is invasive and can cause complications. Elastography refers to a group of methods that use imaging technologies (ultrasound or magnetic resonance) to estimate the stiffness of the liver and therefore the amount of fibrosis present. In each method, a transducer is used to generate shear waves within the liver, and the speed of the waves is measured. The stiffer the tissue, the faster the waves travel, so the speed can be used as, or converted into, a liver stiffness measurement. Three ultrasound-based forms of elastography are currently used: transient elastography (TE), point shear wave elastography (pSWE), and 2-dimensional SWE (2D SWE). TE is widely available and does not need to be performed by a radiologist; however, it is not reliable in patients who are obese or have ascites. More expertise is required to perform pSWE and 2D SWE, but obesity and ascites are not limitations. These methods also measure more of the liver, reducing sampling bias. Magnetic resonance elastography is more accurate than ultrasound-based elastography, but it is more expensive and cannot be used in patients with iron overload in the liver. Elastography technology is advancing rapidly, and new methods are likely to emerge. 

View the full content

Sample eRADIMAGING Course *

* This sample course is for reference purposes only. It is not currently available for earning CE credits. To earn ARRT CE credits please subscribe to eRADIMAGING where you will see a complete listing of all active and eligible CE courses.

Become a member

Satisfy your CE requirements today!

Join now

We offer special group rates, call or email.

908-253-9001

webmaster@eradimaging.com

Newsletter

Enter your email address to receive our new course alerts.