Rad Tech CE, ASRT, ARRT® CE, Category A Credits | Radiology Continuing Education

Approvals/Requirements Satisfied by eRADIMAGING Courses

  • ASRT approval for ARRT Category A credit
  • All Courses eligible of international radiographers' CPD requirements
  • ASRT and MDCB are approved continuing education providers of ARRT and all courses are accepted by ARRT
  • California CE requirements met for all radiography courses
  • NMTCB accepted (All Courses)
  • All Courses available for RRAs
  • ARMRIT accepted (All MRI Courses)
  • MDCB approval by the Medical Dosimetrist Certification (Selected Courses)
  • Florida approval for all courses 1 credit or more
  • ARDMS accepted (All Courses)
  • CAMRT and Sonography Canada recognize the ASRT approval (All Courses)
  • Approval: This course is approved by ASRT - an approved continuing education provider of ARRT.
  • Release Date: 5/20/2021
  • Expiration Date: 5/12/2024
  • Credit Hours: 14.5 Credits
  • Course Description and objectives:

    Course Description
    In the nearly 60 years since the first US Surgeon General's report on the effects of smoking was released, the overwhelming weight of biological, epidemiologic, behavioral, and pharmacologic evidence shows that tobacco use is deadly. This latest report, the 29th to follow the landmark document of 1964, shows that there is no safe level of exposure to cigarette smoke. When inhaled, either directly or secondhand, tobacco smoke exposes its users - and those around them - to more than 7000 chemicals, hundreds of which are hazardous, and at least 69 are known to cause cancer. Cells of the body rapidly absorb these chemicals, inducing disease-causing cellular changes that affect a myriad of biological processes, ranging from the immune and cardiovascular systems, to those culminating in a wide range of cancers.

    Part 2 of the 2010 Surgeon General's report builds on the evidence demonstrating the causal relationship between smoking and cancers of the lung, larynx, oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, pancreas, bladder, liver, kidney, cervix, and stomach, as well as in those of the colorectal system and many instances of acute myeloid leukemia. It describes the major pathways through which smoking causes cancer, including exposure to carcinogens, the formation of covalent bonds between the carcinogens and DNA, and the ensuing accumulation of permanent somatic mutations in critical genes. Most importantly, the report shows the only proven strategy to reduce the pathogenic processes leading to smoking-related cancers is smoking cessation.

    Part 2 also reviews the epidemiology of smoking-induced cardiovascular disease and the mechanisms through which such disease develops. Evidence shows that the risk increases especially at low levels of exposure to tobacco smoke, leading to endothelial injury, a chronic inflammatory state that contributes to atherogenic disease processes, and a heightened risk of thrombosis.

    Learning Objectives
    After completing this activity, the participant should be able to:

    • ASSESS the epidemiology of smoking-related cancer and cardiovascular diseases (CVD).
    • SUMMARIZE the mechanisms through which tobacco smoking induces cancer and contributes to CVD.
    • ANALYZE the major pathways of cancer causation due to cigarette smoking.
    • EXPLAIN the link between second-hand smoke and CVD.

     Categories: Professional Development/Patient Care Quality

  • CE Information:

    In order to receive CE credit, you must first complete the activity content. When completed, go to the "Take CE Test!" link to access the post-test.

    Submit the completed answers to determine if you have passed the post-test assessment. You must answer 87 out of 116 questions correctly to receive the CE credit. You will have no more than 3 attempts to successfully complete the post-test.

    Participants successfully completing the activity content and passing the post-test will receive 14.5 ARRT Category A credits.

    Approved by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists for ARRT Category A credit.

    Approved by the state of Florida for ARRT Category A credit.

    Texas direct credit.

    This activity may be available in multiple formats or from different sponsors. ARRT does not allow CE activities such as Internet courses, home study programs, or directed readings to be repeated for CE credit in the same biennium.


Surgeon General’s Report on Tobacco Smoke Part 2: Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases

US Department of Health and Human Services

 ABSTRACT

In the nearly 60 years since the first US Surgeon General's report on the effects of smoking was released, the overwhelming weight of biological, epidemiologic, behavioral, and pharmacologic evidence shows that tobacco use is deadly. This latest report, the 29th to follow the landmark document of 1964, shows that there is no safe level of exposure to cigarette smoke. When inhaled, either directly or secondhand, tobacco smoke exposes its users - and those around them - to more than 7000 chemicals, hundreds of which are hazardous, and at least 69 are known to cause cancer. Cells of the body rapidly absorb these chemicals, inducing disease-causing cellular changes that affect a myriad of biological processes, ranging from the immune and cardiovascular systems, to those culminating in a wide range of cancers.

Part 2 of the 2010 Surgeon General's report builds on the evidence demonstrating the causal relationship between smoking and cancers of the lung, larynx, oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus,pancreas, bladder, liver, kidney, cervix, and stomach, as well as in those of the colorectal system and many instances of acute myeloid leukemia. It describes the major pathways through which smoking causes cancer, including exposure to carcinogens, the formation of covalent bonds between the carcinogens and DNA, and the ensuing accumulation of permanent somatic mutations in critical genes. Most importantly, the report shows the only proven strategy to reduce the pathogenic processes leading to smoking-related cancers is smoking cessation.

Part 2 also reviews the epidemiology of smoking-induced cardiovascular disease and the mechanisms through which such disease develops. Evidence shows that the risk increases especially at low levels of exposure to tobacco smoke, leading to endothelial injury, a chronic inflammatory state that contributes to atherogenic disease processes, and a heightened risk of thrombosis.

View the full content

Sample eRADIMAGING Course *

* This sample course is for reference purposes only. It is not currently available for earning CE credits. To earn ARRT CE credits please subscribe to eRADIMAGING where you will see a complete listing of all active and eligible CE courses.

Become a member

Satisfy your CE requirements today!

Join now

We offer special group rates, call or email.

984.227.8560

webmaster@eradimaging.com

Newsletter

Enter your email address to receive our new course alerts.