Rad Tech CE, ASRT, ARRT® CE, Category A Credits | Radiology Continuing Education

Approvals/Requirements Satisfied by eRADIMAGING Courses

  • ASRT approval for ARRT Category A credit
  • All Courses eligible of international radiographers' CPD requirements
  • ASRT and MDCB are approved continuing education providers of ARRT and all courses are accepted by ARRT
  • California CE requirements met for all radiography courses
  • NMTCB accepted (All Courses)
  • All Courses available for RRAs
  • ARMRIT accepted (All MRI Courses)
  • MDCB approval by the Medical Dosimetrist Certification (Selected Courses)
  • Florida approval for all courses 1 credit or more
  • ARDMS accepted (All Courses)
  • CAMRT and Sonography Canada recognize the ASRT approval (All Courses)
  • Approval: This course is approved by ASRT - an approved continuing education provider of ARRT.
  • Release Date: 8/19/2021
  • Expiration Date: 9/1/2024
  • Credit Hours: 3 Credits
  • Course Description and objectives:

    Course Description
    Leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world, gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are a growing economic and health burden on society. These malignancies, including cancers of the stomach, esophagus, pancreas, liver, colon, and rectum, as well as GI stromal and gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrinal tumors, account for more than one-quarter of all newly diagnosed cases and one-third of all deaths annually. Functional nuclear imaging, including positron emission tomography (PET) and related hybrid modes, in particularparticularly PET/computed tomography (CT), have made a notable contribution to the visualization of many cancer types. Using the most common radiopharmaceutical 2-[18F] fluoro-2deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), PET/CT, which permits thecan capture of both metabolic and anatomic imaging data with a single device in a single imaging session, has offered improved diagnostic accuracy while enhancing treatment planning and response assessment, disease staging and prognosis, and overall patient management. The advent of new radiotracers and novel approaches, including dual-tracer PET/CT, dynamic blood flow and dual-phase PET imaging, has offered the possibility of visualizing other metabolic processes than glucose metabolism, many of which offer increased diagnostic accuracy. They have been the focus of much current research. However, the absence of standardized response-assessment criteria for the use of PET/CT in patients with GI cancers remains a critical gap hindering the more widespread use of nuclear imaging in many community clinical settings.

    This course will examine the role of nuclear imaging in GI cancers; it will contain a thorough discussion of a number of the central malignancies, including gastric, pancreatic, esophageal, and CRCs, hepatocellular carcinoma, and GI stromal and neuroendocrinal tumors. Here, the emphasis will be on PET and PET/hybrid techniques, as well as, when apposite, scintigraphy, and will explore imaging's contribution to the diagnosis, staging, the assessment of treatment response, and monitoring of disease recurrence. In all cases, the place of established and investigational radionuclides in the imaging armamentarium will be described as well. Finally, a number of patient case studies will conclude this course, offering practical and real-world illustrations of how nuclear imaging can contribute to the clinical management of patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of underlying GI cancer.

    Learning Objectives
    After completing this course, the participant should be able to:

    • EXPLAIN the epidemiological features of the primary GI cancers.
    • APPRAISE the most important radiopharmaceuticals used in GI nuclear imaging, including their advantages and disadvantages.
    • EVALUATE the most effective imaging modalities for the primary GI malignancies.
    • ASSESS the most appropriate techniques used in the diagnosis, disease staging, the assessment of treatment response, and the monitoring of disease recurrence.
    • ANALYZE new and experimental nuclear -imaging methodologies and their applicability in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

     

     

    Categories: Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Therapy/Dosimetry, CT

  • CE Information:

    In order to receive CE credit, you must first complete the activity content. When completed, go to the "Take CE Test!" link to access the post-test.

    Submit the completed answers to determine if you have passed the post-test assessment. You must answer 18 out of 24 questions correctly to receive the CE credit. You will have no more than 3 attempts to successfully complete the post-test.

    Participants successfully completing the activity content and passing the post-test will receive 3.0 ARRT Category A credits.

    Approved by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists for ARRT Category A credit.

    Approved by the state of Florida for ARRT Category A credit.

    Texas direct credit.

    This activity may be available in multiple formats or from different sponsors. ARRT does not allow CE activities such as Internet courses, home study programs, or directed readings to be repeated for CE credit in the same biennium.    

  • Structured Education Credit Valuations:

    CategoryContent AreaCredits
    Computed TomographyProcedures0.75
    Magnetic ResonanceProcedures0.75
    Nuclear MedicineProcedures3
    PTHProcedures0.75
    Radiation TherapyPatient Care1.5
    Radiation TherapyProcedures0.75
    RadiographyProcedures0.75
    Radiologist AssistantProcedures2.25
    SonographyProcedures0.75

  • CQR Credit Valuations:

    CategorySubcategoryCredits
    Computed TomographyAbdomen and Pelvis0.75
    Magnetic ResonanceBody0.75
    Nuclear MedicineEndocrine and Oncology Procedures1
    Nuclear MedicineGastrointestinal and Genitourinary Procedures2
    PTHTreatment Sites0.75
    Radiation TherapyPatient and Medical Records Management1.5
    Radiation TherapyTreatment Sites and Tumors0.75
    RadiographyThorax and Abdomen Procedures0.75
    Radiologist AssistantAbdominal Section 2.25
    SonographyAbdomen 0.75


The Role of Nuclear Imaging in Gastrointestinal Disorders: GI Cancers

Steven Marks

*President, MedCom Consultants, Inc, Potomac, Maryland

Address correspondence to: Steven Marks, MedCom Consultants Inc, 1311 Fallsmead Way, Potomac, Maryland, 20854. E-mail: steven.marks52@gmail.com.

Disclosure statement: Steven Marks reports having no financial or advisory relationship with any corporate, medical, or political organization doing work related to this paper or other business activity at MedCom Consultants, Inc.

ABSTRACT

Leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world, gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are a growing economic and health burden on society. These malignancies, including cancers of the stomach, esophagus, pancreas, liver, colon, and rectum, as well as GI stromal and gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrinal tumors, account for more than one-quarter of all newly diagnosed cases and one-third of all deaths annually. Functional nuclear imaging, including positron emission tomography (PET) and related hybrid modes, particularly PET/computed tomography (CT), have made a notable contribution to the visualization of many cancer types. Using the most common radiopharmaceutical 2-[18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), PET/CT, which can capture both metabolic and anatomic imaging data with a single device in a single imaging session, has offered improved diagnostic accuracy while enhancing treatment planning and response assessment, disease staging and prognosis, and overall patient management. The advent of new radiotracers and novel approaches, including dual-tracer PET/CT, dynamic blood flow and dual-phase PET imaging, has offered the possibility of visualizing other metabolic processes than glucose metabolism, many of which offer increased diagnostic accuracy. They have been the focus of much current research. However, the absence of standardized response-assessment criteria for the use of PET/CT in patients with GI cancers remains a critical gap hindering the more widespread use of nuclear imaging in many community clinical settings.

This course will examine the role of nuclear imaging in GI cancers; it will contain a thorough discussion of a number of the central malignancies, including gastric, pancreatic, esophageal, and CRCs, hepatocellular carcinoma, and GI stromal and neuroendocrinal tumors. Here, the emphasis will be on PET and PET/hybrid techniques, as well as, when apposite, scintigraphy, and will explore imaging's contribution to the diagnosis, staging, the assessment of treatment response, and monitoring of disease recurrence. In all cases, the place of established and investigational radionuclides in the imaging armamentarium will be described as well. Finally, a number of patient case studies will conclude this course, offering practical and real-world illustrations of how nuclear imaging can contribute to the clinical management of patients presenting with symptoms suggestive of underlying GI cancer.    

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Sample eRADIMAGING Course *

* This sample course is for reference purposes only. It is not currently available for earning CE credits. To earn ARRT CE credits please subscribe to eRADIMAGING where you will see a complete listing of all active and eligible CE courses.

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