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  • Approval: This course is approved by ASRT - an approved continuing education provider of ARRT.
  • Release Date: 9/23/2021
  • Expiration Date: 10/1/2024
  • Credit Hours: 16 Credits
  • Course Description and objectives:

    Course Description
    The 2010 Surgeon General's report on smoking is the 29th in a series of scientific documents released since the initial 1964 paper first summarized the adverse effects of tobacco use on health and its contribution to the onset of a variety of diseases. Despite the great strides that have been made since that original landmark survey, each year, more than 440 000 deaths occur due to smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke. The costs to society are staggering, particularly as they related to both public and private medical expenses and lost productivity. Even more important, the human suffering and loss is incalculable. There is no risk-free level of exposure to tobacco smoke. The complex mixture of combustible compounds in tobacco smoke cause a host of adverse health outcomes that affect both smokers and nonsmokers exposed to tobacco use alike.

    Part 3 of the Surgeon General's report discusses 2 of the most important of these health outcomes: the relationship between smoking and pulmonary diseases and the reproductive/developmental effects induced by exposure to tobacco smoke. It describes how the oxidative stress induced by tobacco smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), while the ensuing imbalance between protease and antiprotease plays a key role in the onset of emphysema. Moreover, the report amplifies how smoking in men leads to chromosomal changes that impairs fertility, pregnancy viability, and offspring anomalies, while maternal smoking is associated with a range of pregnancy complications, ranging from fetal cleft abnormalities to alternations in cardiovascular structure and function, dysfunctions in the immune system, a variety of reproductive endpoints, and most importantly, cognitive, neurological, and developmental impairment in the offspring of smokers. Finally, the research continues to demonstrate that smoking cessation is the only established method to reduce the pathological effects of smoking on both parents and their children.

    Learning Objectives

    After completing this activity, the participant should be able to:

    • ASSESS the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical courses of pulmonary diseases stemming from the use of tobacco products.
    • ANALYZE the various respiratory defense mechanisms brought into play as a response to provocation by tobacco smoke.
    • SUMMARIZE the cellular and molecular mechanisms of smoking's effects on premenopausal and pregnant women and on fetal tissue and organogenesis, including the development of neonatal polymorphisms.
    • EXPLAIN the implications of smoking cessation on neonatal development.

     

    Categories: Professional Development/Patient Care Quality

  • CE Information:

    In order to receive CE credit, you must first complete the activity content. When completed, go to the "Take CE Test!" link to access the post-test.

    Submit the completed answers to determine if you have passed the post-test assessment. You must answer 96 out of 128 questions correctly to receive the CE credit. You will have no more than 3 attempts to successfully complete the post-test.

    Participants successfully completing the activity content and passing the post-test will receive 16.0 ARRT Category A credits.

    Approved by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists for ARRT Category A credit.

    Approved by the state of Florida for ARRT Category A credit.

    Texas direct credit.

    This activity may be available in multiple formats or from different sponsors. ARRT does not allow CE activities such as Internet courses, home study programs, or directed readings to be repeated for CE credit in the same biennium.    


Surgeon General’s Report on Tobacco Smoke Part 3: Pulmonary Diseases and Reproductive/Developmental Effects

US Department of Health and Human Services

ABSTRACT

The 2010 Surgeon General's report on smoking is the 29th in a series of scientific documents released since the initial 1964 paper first summarized the adverse effects of tobacco use on health and its contribution to the onset of a variety of diseases. Despite the great strides that have been made since that original landmark survey, each year, more than 440 000 deaths occur due to smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke. The costs to society are staggering, particularly as they related to both public and private medical expenses and lost productivity. Even more important, the human suffering and loss is incalculable. There is no risk-free level of exposure to tobacco smoke. The complex mixture of combustible compounds in tobacco smoke cause a host of adverse health outcomes that affect both smokers and nonsmokers exposed to tobacco use alike.

Part 3 of the Surgeon General's report discusses 2 of the most important of these health outcomes: the relationship between smoking and pulmonary diseases and the reproductive/developmental effects induced by exposure to tobacco smoke. It describes how the oxidative stress induced by tobacco smoke contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), while the ensuing imbalance between protease and antiprotease plays a key role in the onset of emphysema. Moreover, the report amplifies how smoking in men leads to chromosomal changes that impairs fertility, pregnancy viability, and offspring anomalies, while maternal smoking is associated with a range of pregnancy complications, ranging from fetal cleft abnormalities to alternations in cardiovascular structure and function, dysfunctions in the immune system, a variety of reproductive endpoints, and most importantly, cognitive, neurological, and developmental impairment in the offspring of smokers. Finally, the research continues to demonstrate that smoking cessation is the only established method to reduce the pathological effects of smoking on both parents and their children.

     

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