Rad Tech CE, ASRT, ARRT® CE, Category A Credits | Radiology Continuing Education

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  • ASRT approval for ARRT Category A credit
  • All Courses eligible of international radiographers' CPD requirements
  • ASRT and MDCB are approved continuing education providers of ARRT and all courses are accepted by ARRT
  • California CE requirements met for all radiography courses
  • NMTCB accepted (All Courses)
  • All Courses available for RRAs
  • ARMRIT accepted (All MRI Courses)
  • MDCB approval by the Medical Dosimetrist Certification (Selected Courses)
  • Florida approval for all courses 1 credit or more
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  • CAMRT and Sonography Canada recognize the ASRT approval (All Courses)
  • Approval: This course is approved by ASRT - an approved continuing education provider of ARRT.
  • Release Date: 1/25/2022
  • Expiration Date: 2/1/2025
  • Credit Hours: 2.5 Credits
  • Course Description and objectives:

    Course Description
    The first computed tomography (CT) clinical scan was performed in 1971. Since the introduction of these early systems, which were slow to acquire and reconstruct data, improvements in temporal and spatial resolution, including dual-source CT and other approaches to increase the number of slices acquired in parallel, now permit the capture of complete organs in a single rotation, thereby reducing noise and the generation of motion artifacts. The imaging itself is mathematically grounded in the Radon transform, the underlying algebraic principle of CT technology, which allows computation of the original function values from line-integral values and the reconstruction of the final image. Using the Fourier slice theorem, a related property, further grounds the process of filtered back-projection.

    Three-dimensional CT image volumes are obtained by acquiring, reconstructing, and stacking multiple picture slices at slightly offset axial locations using a variety of analytic and algebraic algorithms. The development of third-generation CT scanners, combined with the introduction of multiple detector rows, facilitates the capture of large fields-of-view containing the entire target object in a single rotation. Moreover, the invention of helical CT technologies, in which projections from all angles in an axial plane can be interpolated, enables the use of standard reconstruction methods to visualize larger parts of the body with only a small number of detector rows.

    Practical aspects of CT image reconstruction, including the spatial resolution of small objects, the prevention of noise and various artefacts (eg, scan, scatter, and motion), and polychromatic aberrations, are considered, as these imperfections can compromise the quality of the scan. Finally, the special calculations required for spectral CT detection, such as dual kVp and dual-kVp/dual-source techniques, are described, as these approaches generate measures directly related to the physical properties of the object or tissue under investigation.

    Learning Objectives

    After reading the content, the participant should be able to:

    • EXPLAIN the underlying mathematical principles used in the process of computed tomography (CT) image formation.
    • IDENTIFY the core analytic and algebraic methods, along with the essential acquisition geometries, required for CT image reconstruction.
    • ASSESS the practical considerations required to achieve adequate spatial resolution, minimal noise, and the reduced influence of image artifacts.
    • ANALYZE the factors that impact the X-ray attenuation of CT-measured objects, such as bone and soft tissue.
    • DIFFERENTIATE the several detection techniques and technologies used in spectral CT measurements.

     

    Category: Computed Tomography

  • CE Information:

    In order to receive CE credit, you must first complete the activity content. When completed, go to the "Take CE Test!" link to access the post-test.

    Submit the completed answers to determine if you have passed the post-test assessment. You must answer 21 out of 28 questions correctly to receive the CE credit. You will have no more than 3 attempts to successfully complete the post-test.

    Participants successfully completing the activity content and passing the post-test will receive 2.5 ARRT Category A credits.

    Approved by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists for ARRT Category A credit.

    Approved by the state of Florida for ARRT Category A credit.

    Texas direct credit.

    This activity may be available in multiple formats or from different sponsors. ARRT does not allow CE activities such as Internet courses, home study programs, or directed readings to be repeated for CE credit in the same biennium.

  • Structured Education Credit Valuations:

    CategoryContent AreaCredits
    Computed TomographyImage Production2.5
    Nuclear MedicineImage Production1
    Radiation TherapyProcedures1

  • CQR Credit Valuations:

    CategorySubcategoryCredits
    Computed TomographyImage Evaluation and Archiving1.25
    Computed TomographyImage Formation 1.25
    Nuclear MedicineInstrumentation 1
    Radiation TherapyTreatment Volume Localization1


Computed Tomography (Textbook Chapter)

by Oliver Taubmann, Martin Berger, Marco Bögel, Yan Xia, Michael Balda, and Andreas Maier

ABSTRACT

The first computed tomography (CT) clinical scan was performed in 1971. Since the introduction of these early systems, which were slow to acquire and reconstruct data, improvements in temporal and spatial resolution, including dual-source CT and other approaches to increase the number of slices acquired in parallel, now permit the capture of complete organs in a single rotation, thereby reducing noise and the generation of motion artifacts. The imaging itself is mathematically grounded in the Radon transform, the underlying algebraic principle of CT technology, which allows computation of the original function values from line-integral values and the reconstruction of the final image. Using the Fourier slice theorem, a related property, further grounds the process of filtered back-projection.

Three-dimensional CT image volumes are obtained by acquiring, reconstructing, and stacking multiple picture slices at slightly offset axial locations using a variety of analytic and algebraic algorithms. The development of third-generation CT scanners, combined with the introduction of multiple detector rows, facilitates the capture of large fields-of-view containing the entire target object in a single rotation. Moreover, the invention of helical CT technologies, in which projections from all angles in an axial plane can be interpolated, enables the use of standard reconstruction methods to visualize larger parts of the body with only a small number of detector rows.

This book chapter will cover practical aspects of CT image reconstruction, including the spatial resolution of small objects, the prevention of noise and various artefacts (eg, scan, scatter, and motion), and polychromatic aberrations, are considered, as these imperfections can compromise the quality of the scan. Finally, the special calculations required for spectral CT detection, such as dual kVp and dual-kVp/dual-source techniques, are described, as these approaches generate measures directly related to the physical properties of the object or tissue under investigation.

View the full content

Sample eRADIMAGING Course *

* This sample course is for reference purposes only. It is not currently available for earning CE credits. To earn ARRT CE credits please subscribe to eRADIMAGING where you will see a complete listing of all active and eligible CE courses.

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